ECTSInternational Political Economy

International Political Economy (ECON422) Course Detail

Course Name Course Code Season Lecture Hours Application Hours Lab Hours Credit ECTS
International Political Economy ECON422 7. Semester 3 0 0 3 6
Pre-requisite Course(s)
N/A
Course Language English
Course Type Elective Courses
Course Level Bachelor’s Degree (First Cycle)
Mode of Delivery Face To Face
Learning and Teaching Strategies Lecture, Demonstration.
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
  • Asst. Prof. Dr. Gürsan Şenalp
Course Assistants
Course Objectives This course is designed for both students of department of economics and international relations. Considering their different backgrounds and skills in this course we will discuss events as they unfold before our eyes and you will learn how to better understand the world we live in. The goal of the course is to provide you with the basic knowledge to gain literacy in international political economy with which you can then either apply in your daily lives or go on to further pursue this field after you transfer.
Course Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • To capture the merits of being “critical” in social sciences.
  • To learn critical perspectives within the IPE on the nature of the world orders
  • To develop a truly historical understanding towards the nature of the global political economy
Course Content The problems of the state or the nations stemming from the globalization; global political theories, critique of the political economy, international production relations; the structure of international trade; the international financial system.

Weekly Subjects and Releated Preparation Studies

Week Subjects Preparation
1 Introduction and a general overview of the course Chapter 1, “What is International Political Economy?” Balaam & Veseth (B&V).
2 Discussion of current events Chapter 1, “What is International Political Economy?” Balaam & Veseth (B&V).
3 Mercantilism/Economic Nationalism and the Liberal IPE Perspective and Globalization Chapter 2. “Wealth and Power: Mercantilism and Economic Nationalism” (B&V) Robert Gilpin, "The Politics of Transnational Economic Relations," International Organization 25 (Summer 1971), pp.398-419. Kenneth N. Waltz (1979) Theory of International Politics, Chapter 1. “Laws and Theories,” pp.1-17. Chapter 3. “Laissez-Faire, Laissez Passer: The Liberal IPE Perspective” (B&V) Robert L. Heilbroner (1995) [1955] Worldly Philosophers, Chapter 3. “Wonderful World of Adam Smith,” Chapter 6. The Inexorable System of Karl Marx” and Chapter 9. “Heresies of John Maynard Keynes.” Karl Polanyi (2001) [1944] The Great Transformation, “Part Two: Rise and Fall of Market Economy,” pp.35-81.
4 Mercantilism/Economic Nationalism and the Liberal IPE Perspective and Globalization Chapter 2. “Wealth and Power: Mercantilism and Economic Nationalism” (B&V) Robert Gilpin, "The Politics of Transnational Economic Relations," International Organization 25 (Summer 1971), pp.398-419. Kenneth N. Waltz (1979) Theory of International Politics, Chapter 1. “Laws and Theories,” pp.1-17. Chapter 3. “Laissez-Faire, Laissez Passer: The Liberal IPE Perspective” (B&V) Robert L. Heilbroner (1995) [1955] Worldly Philosophers, Chapter 3. “Wonderful World of Adam Smith,” Chapter 6. The Inexorable System of Karl Marx” and Chapter 9. “Heresies of John Maynard Keynes.” Karl Polanyi (2001) [1944] The Great Transformation, “Part Two: Rise and Fall of Market Economy,” pp.35-81.
5 Classical Imperialism Theories in Retrospective: Hobson, Hilferding, Luxemburg, Bukharin, Kautsky and Lenin Chapter 4. “Marx, Lenin and the Structuralist Perspective,” (B&V) E. M. Winslow (1931) “Marxian, Liberal and Sociological Theories of Imperialism,” Journal of Political Economy 39 (6) Bob Rowthorn (1975) “Imperialism in the 70s: Unity or Rivalry?” New Left Review 1/69 J. Willoughby (1979) “The Lenin-Kautsky Unity-Rivalry Debate,” Review of Radical Political Economy 11 (4) Karl Kautsky (1970) [1914] “Ultraimperialism,” New Left Review 1/59
6 Classical Imperialism Theories in Retrospective: Hobson, Hilferding, Luxemburg, Bukharin, Kautsky and Lenin Chapter 4. “Marx, Lenin and the Structuralist Perspective,” (B&V) E. M. Winslow (1931) “Marxian, Liberal and Sociological Theories of Imperialism,” Journal of Political Economy 39 (6) Bob Rowthorn (1975) “Imperialism in the 70s: Unity or Rivalry?” New Left Review 1/69 J. Willoughby (1979) “The Lenin-Kautsky Unity-Rivalry Debate,” Review of Radical Political Economy 11 (4) Karl Kautsky (1970) [1914] “Ultraimperialism,” New Left Review 1/59
7 Critical Political Economy I – From Rational Choice to Postmodernism in IPE Critical Political Economy II - Italian School and Amsterdam IPE Project Robert W. Cox, (1981) “Social Forces, States and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory,” Millennium: Journal of International Studies 10 (2), 126-55 Robert W. Cox (1983) “Gramsci, Hegemony and International Relations: An Essay in Method,” Millenium Journal of International Studies 12 (2), 162-75.
8 Critical Political Economy I – From Rational Choice to Postmodernism in IPE Critical Political Economy II - Italian School and Amsterdam IPE Project Robert W. Cox, (1981) “Social Forces, States and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory,” Millennium: Journal of International Studies 10 (2), 126-55 Robert W. Cox (1983) “Gramsci, Hegemony and International Relations: An Essay in Method,” Millenium Journal of International Studies 12 (2), 162-75.
9 Midterm
10 Structure of IPE (I): International Production and Trade Chapter 6. “Production, Finance, Security and Knowledge,” (B&V) Peter Dicken, Global Shift: Transforming the World Economy (3rd Edition), Chapter 2. “Global Economic Map: Trends in Production, Trade and Investment,” pp.24-78 and Chapter 3. “The State is Dead… Long Live the State,” pp.79-113. William I. Robinson (2004) A Theory of Global Capitalism: Production, State and Class in a Transnational World, Chapter 1. “Globalization as Epochal Change in World Capitalism,” pp.1-33. UNCTAD, World Investment Report 2008, New York
11 Structure of IPE (I): International Production and Trade Chapter 6. “Production, Finance, Security and Knowledge,” (B&V) Peter Dicken, Global Shift: Transforming the World Economy (3rd Edition), Chapter 2. “Global Economic Map: Trends in Production, Trade and Investment,” pp.24-78 and Chapter 3. “The State is Dead… Long Live the State,” pp.79-113. William I. Robinson (2004) A Theory of Global Capitalism: Production, State and Class in a Transnational World, Chapter 1. “Globalization as Epochal Change in World Capitalism,” pp.1-33. UNCTAD, World Investment Report 2008, New York
12 Structure of IPE (II) – The IPE of International Monetary and Financial Structure Chapter 7. (B&V) Chapter 8. “International Finance: Mad Money,” (B&V)
13 Question of Global Governance: A view from the “Contenders” Kees Van der Pijl (2008) “China’s Challenge to the West in the 21st Century,” CGPE Working Paper #1, Univ. of Sussex Naomi Klein (2007) The Shock Doctrine, “Introduction,” pp.3-22 and Part 1, “Two Doctors Shock: Research and Development,” pp.23-72.
14 Question of Global Governance: A view from the “Contenders” Kees Van der Pijl (2008) “China’s Challenge to the West in the 21st Century,” CGPE Working Paper #1, Univ. of Sussex Naomi Klein (2007) The Shock Doctrine, “Introduction,” pp.3-22 and Part 1, “Two Doctors Shock: Research and Development,” pp.23-72.

Sources

Course Book 1. David N. Balaam & Michael Veseth (B&V), Introduction to International Political Economy, 4th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008
2. Theodore H. Cohn, Global Political Economy: Theory and Practice, New-York: Pearson/Longman, 2004

Evaluation System

Requirements Number Percentage of Grade
Attendance/Participation 1 10
Laboratory - -
Application - -
Field Work - -
Special Course Internship - -
Quizzes/Studio Critics - -
Homework Assignments 3 5
Presentation - -
Project - -
Report - -
Seminar - -
Midterms Exams/Midterms Jury 1 35
Final Exam/Final Jury 1 50
Toplam 6 100
Percentage of Semester Work 50
Percentage of Final Work 50
Total 100

Course Category

Core Courses X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

The Relation Between Course Learning Competencies and Program Qualifications

# Program Qualifications / Competencies Level of Contribution
1 2 3 4 5
1 Acquiring the skills of understanding, explaining, and using the fundamental concepts and methods of economics X
2 Acquiring the skills of macro level economic analysis X
3 Acquiring the skills of micro level economic analysis
4 Understanding the formulation and implementation of economic policies at the local, national, regional, and/or global level X
5 Learning different approaches on economic and related issues X
6 Acquiring the quantitative and/or qualitative techniques in economic analysis
7 Improving the ability to use the modern software, hardware and/or technological devices
8 Developing intra-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary team work skills X
9 Acquiring an open-minded behavior through encouraging critical analysis, discussions, and/or life-long learning X
10 Adopting work ethic and social responsibility
11 Developing the skills of communication.
12 Improving the ability to effectively implement the knowledge and skills in at least one of the following areas: economic policy, public policy, international economic relations, industrial relations, monetary and financial affairs. X

ECTS/Workload Table

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Total Workload
Course Hours (Including Exam Week: 16 x Total Hours) 16 3 48
Laboratory
Application
Special Course Internship
Field Work
Study Hours Out of Class 16 6 96
Presentation/Seminar Prepration
Project
Report
Homework Assignments
Quizzes/Studio Critics
Prepration of Midterm Exams/Midterm Jury 1 2 2
Prepration of Final Exams/Final Jury 1 3 3
Total Workload 149